August 2017 Highlight

Though I encountered several surprises during my Marion County August 2017 List, one bird stands out as August 2017 Highlight.

But first a few of the surprises.

A Blue Grosbeak we encountered on both trips to Southwestway Park.
The Purple Martins flying over Eagle Creek Reservoir.
And the Summer Tanager at Southwestway Park.

August 2017 Highlight – Red-shouldered Hawk Bathing

But the biggest surprise was watching a Red-shouldered Hawk bathing at Eagle Creek.

I encountered the hawk on the trail north of the Handicapped Road. I just happened to catch a glimpse when it moved on a sunlit perch by a creek. At first I thought it was hunting but it jumped into the water and proceeded to take a bath. Then it flew back up on the sunlit perch and dried off. Then it jumped back in the water. I watched this behavior for 15 minutes while it repeated the cycle three times during the time I watched.

I first spotted the Red-shouldered Hawk sitting in the sun.
It wasn’t long before it headed down into the water. You can see it in the small pool of water in the photo’s center.
Then back onto the perch for sun.
And back down into the water.
August 2017 Highlight
And back up.

Checking a couple of sources on-line this seems to be the typical bathing habits of hawks. Deep in the woods, shallow stream, and low perch to dry. The reason I don’t think I have encountered this behavior before is hawk’s preference of bathing in a deep glade.

Eventually I moved on and made the loop around the trail. I checked on my way back but the hawk had moved on. But another one of those rare nature encounters which keeps you going out week after week.

August Birding 2017 Week 4

August Birding 2017 Week 4 can be summed up in one word, robins. And goldfinches. OK, two words. But mainly robins. Not many additions to the August list but there were a couple of surprises.

At both Southwestway Park Saturday and the local park Sunday American Robins were out in force. It seemed every movement I checked on was a robin. And if it wasn’t a robin it was an American Goldfinch doing a different call.

The star of the weekend – vast numbers of American Robins.
Brown Thrashers made a return last week after being quiet for the summer. Each day I heard 3 or 4 SMACKING in the bush.
And Indigo Buntings made a return doing their loud CHIP call.
Red-winged Blackbirds made their return from their summer molt.

Otherwise it was relatively quit. Mike and I had hoped for warblers but a lone Blackburnian Warbler was it for Saturday. I even checked the flooded field and Soccer field without much action.

Without rain the local flooded field is going to be gone by Labor Day.

Weekend Star

Since not much else was happening a male Summer Tanager was a welcome surprise. While watching the before mentioned robins the tanager appeared out of nowhere. Though he wasn’t close his colors still stood out.

The Summer Tanager kept to the early morning shadows.
Once he jumped up a little higher the yellow on his belly became apparent.
We finally got a chance to see his bright colors in the morning sun.
August Birding 2017 Week 4
A few butterflies were out including several Monarchs.

With the addition of three species I’m in the low 90’s for the month. I might get a chance to go out early Wednesday or Thursday but that darn work keeps interfering!

So I’m guessing 100 isn’t a possibility unless I luck into a wave of warblers.

Summer Tanager 1st Summer Male

It’s been a dry spell for seeing a Summer Tanager locally. Almost two years. June 13, 2015 to be exact. And I have only seen 6 in the 5 years I’ve lived in Indiana. So, it was a pleasant surprise to spend a few minutes with a Summer Tanager 1st Summer Male.

What’s ironic is I thought I’d see more when we move to Indiana from North-central Illinois. But the catch is one pair nested annually at the local state park in Illinois. Not counting that pair the numbers are about even in both states.

After the rain stopped Saturday Mike and I went to Atterbury FWA hoping to hear a Black-billed Cuckoo. We should have gone earlier during the rain since I usually hear/see them during a light rain. This is one of the various reasons they have the nickname “Rain Crow”. No luck on the cuckoo though.

The woods were full of new migrants and we had a good time relearning calls and spotting new arrivals.  We had worked the road pretty good and I was returning to the car when I heard a previously seen Blue-winged Warbler. This time it was much closer to the road.

The Blue-winged Warbler was working close to the road and getting closer.

While watching the Blue-winged Warbler I noticed a bird in the background. It was larger than the warblers and sparrows in the area.

A Summer Tanager 1st Summer Male

A tough call, keep on the Blue-winged Warbler or the Summer Tanager. I see a few Blue-winged Warblers annually so the tanager won out.

The bird in the background was a Summer Tanager 1st Summer Male. Nothing better than seeing a bright, multi-colored bird in Indiana.

I immediately got a couple of photos which turned out to be a good idea since it didn’t hang around long. Then it moved on. I spent time looking and listening but didn’t sight it again.

1st Summer Male
A very distinctive bird for our area. Bright red-orange, yellow and green. Nothing else it could be unless a migrant Western Tanager came our way. I’ll have to seek out an adult male Summer Tanager this summer.
Luckily the Blue-winged Warbler continued to call during the Summer Tanager encounter. When I returned he had moved closer to the road.