Northern Harrier – Weekend Highlight

After a couple of weekends of lousy photo weather I finally have a few photos to pick a highlight. Not saying there are any good photos but at least I have photos to build a story. Especially one about a Northern Harrier.

One of Bob’s Birding Rules (I need to post them) is to turn around and go home when it’s foggy. I should’ve listened to myself and waited until the fog lifted. But I don’t know if it was the crappy weather we’ve been having or traveling for work, but as soon as it was light I was out the door Saturday morning. I knew traveling to the retention ponds the odds of seeing wasn’t good.

Arriving a little before sunrise there wasn’t much fog. But as the day brightened the fog started to build. This really didn’t matter since there wasn’t any waterfowl on the ponds except for a couple of distant Northern Shovelers.

With the warm weather I think the birds thought it was spring. Species I usually don’t hear until March, like meadowlarks, were calling. So I walked the near side of the tree line and listened.

Here’s a photo of an American Tree Sparrow to show how foggy it was a little after sunrise.

The other side of the tree line where the meadowlarks were calling is the large grass area. I decided to make a quick stop and get a meadowlark count (a minimum of 10 counted) or a photo.

Several of the Eastern Meadowlarks were close to the road allowing foggy photos.

There are two Eastern Meadowlarks in this photo taken from no more than 50 feet.
The more vocal of the two who sang constantly while I was there.
The other one didn’t like I was so close and flew. I’m posting this photo to show the density of the fog.

Then out of the fog came a raptor.

This is the view to the north in the general direction of the meadowlark photos. The visibility has to be less than 100 feet.
Northern Harrier
At first I thought it was the local Red-tailed Hawk. But it didn’t take long from its hunting motion to know it was a Northern Harrier. My first for the local area.
And just like that the Northern Harrier was gone into the fog. Did I really see it? Was it a ghost?

I don’t like getting glimpses of birds. Especially ones I don’t see so often. Luckily I saw several Northern Harriers in Colorado so I didn’t feel so bad.

The other odd thing for a January day was a flock of Sandhill Cranes landing near the local park. Odd it’s January and they landed locally. All the rain?

A distant photo of the Sandhill Cranes circling to land (I think) in a nearby field.

 

I’m trying to enlarge a portion of the photo to show the cranes but it didn’t work so well.

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