Shorebird Saturday and a Cuckoo

Regular readers will notice I haven’t been as proficient blogging the last few weeks. I’ve been traveling for work and honestly the little time I’ve been in the field hasn’t been productive for blogging. Last Saturday I had family matters to take care of early and didn’t get a chance to head out until late morning.

My plan was to meander towards Johnson County Park checking for shorebirds. Since I’ve been in the car too much the last three weeks, once at the park I was going to take a long walk looking for butterflies.

The score on the flooded fields wasn’t bad. Of the sites I know in the eastern part of Johnson County there were 5 with water and shorebirds and 4 overgrown with weeds.

There wasn’t anything unusual in the way of shorebirds but I had close views of Pectoral and Least Sandpipers.

A distant flooded field just south of Indianapolis. Last week I had a flyover Upland Sandpiper that landed in the tall grass south of the water. I tried to digiscope but failed miserably. And my P900 camera came back from the shop later that day. Figures…

I can’t ever remember being this close to Pectoral and Least Sandpipers¬†without flushing them.

The Pec continued to feed ignoring me. There were 22 additional Pecs farther out in the field .

This photos shows why field guides often say Least Sandpipers look like small Pectoral Sandpipers.

A Solitary Sandpiper was the lone bird in this flooded field. Not even a Killdeer.

On the day I only ended up with 5 species of shorebirds with Pectorals numerous at most stops. Hopefully the water will stay with us for a while.

Finally arriving at Johnson County Park I took the long walk to enjoy the nice weather. Butterflies were sparse except for around the small man-made pond.

Tawny Emperor

Tawny-edged Skipper

Common Buckeye

Yellow-billed Cuckoo – Star of the Day

I initially caught a glimpse of it flying across the path and its size made me think of a light-colored Brown Thrasher. It proceeded to jump out giving great looks. And it didn’t seem to mind my presence.

cuckoo

One of those rare occasions when a¬†Yellow-billed Cuckoo wasn’t lurking in the trees.

I know I’ve stated I don’t like close-up photos, but with the cuckoo this close I couldn’t resist.

My newest favorite photo showing both the bill and the tail of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

This entry was posted in Johnson/Marion County and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Shorebird Saturday and a Cuckoo

  1. Greg M says:

    What a great Cuckoo series! So cool that you got such a good view.

    • BobC says:

      Thanks. Like I stated I don’t remember a cuckoo not flushing into the growth when anyone gets close. This one just wasn’t bothered by my presence.

  2. Michael Clay says:

    Perhaps the cuckoo was migrating and it wasn’t as easily flushed. Glad you got your camera back

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *