Western Colorado Black Butterfly

This past Sunday morning I finally found time to get out before the deluge hit.  The dark skies prohibited photos but there were numerous Golden-crowned Kinglets and Yellow-rumped Warblers. Without photos from Sunday I’ll use material from June’s Western Colorado trip, particularly a Western Colorado Black Butterfly.

Without the chance to get out the past weekends I’ve been going through photos from last summer. After doing the Uncompahgre Plateau Breeding Birding Survey I spent the afternoon in an alpine meadow watching butterflies. Since I’m still a rookie with butterflies I’ve waited to gain knowledge before I attempted to ID the ones I photographed. So it came as a mild surprise when I came across a black butterfly.

As you can tell by comparing it to the dandelion head it’s not very big.

It then headed over to a fence post where it hid from the sun for a few minutes.

This is the best photo of the black butterfly.

The previous photo cropped and slightly enlarged.

I would like to ID this as a Magdalena Alpine but a couple of things stop that call.

First, it’s size. A Magdalena Alpine is slightly smaller than a Clouded Sulphur. Looking at the first photo and comparing to the dandelion head this is smaller, maybe Eastern Tailed-blue size. The expected Common Alpine is that size.

Second, the expected range for the Magdalena Alpine is the higher Rockies of Central Colorado. I was at 9000′ feet so maybe the elevation was correct but the location wasn’t.  The Common Alpine is expected in Western Colorado.

Third, the angle of the forewing looks more like a Common Alpine at rest versus the Magdalena.

And lastly, take a look at the next photo. This is why you should take notes immediately and tag photos. I’m not 100% certain this is the same butterfly but the time stamps fit. This shows the reddish eyespots of the Common Alpine.

Black Butterfly

I’ll now post a few photos on one of the internet ID help pages and see what kind of reply I receive.

This entry was posted in General. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *