Different Looking, but Act the Same

I previously blogged about birds I saw in London that looked slightly different from birds we see in the US. Birds like coots and wrens. While at the London Wetlands Centre I birded with a couple of British birders and we discussed birds which are in the same family, act the same, even might sound the same, but look different.

Following are some of those birds I think fall into that category.

Northern Lapwing

Probably the most obvious was the Northern Lapwing. Even though they don’t look or sound like a Killdeer, they sure act like one. London Wetlands Centre 4/5/16

Black-headed Gull

On second thought I should have included the Black-headed Gull in the first group since it does look like a Bonaparte’s Gull. However while watching it fly I could tell it was larger since it didn’t have the Bonaparte’s “bouncy” flight. London Wetlands Centre 4/5/16

Eurasian Blackbird

The Eurasian Blackbird is a thrush, it is about the same size, and acts like an American Robin. But the similarities end there. Hyde Park 4/5/16

European Robin

This one’s a stretch. At first the European Robin reminded me of an Eastern Bluebird with them both being thrushes. Now I don’t think as much. Cute little bird though. Hyde Park 4/5/16

Eurasian Blue Tit

Now everything except appearance about the Eurasian Blue Tit was like a Carolina Chickadee, even its call. Hyde Park 4/05/16

Common Redshank

Looking at the Common Redshank now, it appears more like a Greater Yellowlegs than it did in the field. In the field it was bigger and slower moving. London Wetlands Center 4/05/16

Common Snipe

The Common Snipe should have gone with the birds that look similar. Nothing different about it from the Wilson’s Snipe. My mistake. London Wetlands Centre 4/5/16

Little Grebe

The Little Grebe did act like a Pied-billed Grebe, just a lot more colorful. London Wetlands Centre 4/5/16

European Goldfinch different from AMGO

And now my family’s favorite photo, an European Goldfinch. They act like American Goldfinches but as you can see don’t look anything like them. London’s Theatre District 4/3/16

This entry was posted in Europe and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Different Looking, but Act the Same

  1. Greg says:

    I think European Robins are chats, not thrushes. I like your series of comparisons; they are pretty well spot on.

    • BobC says:

      You are correct. In my defense they are listed under Thrushes in my 2009 Collins Birds of Europe. A quick look doesn’t give the date of the move to chats. I’ll have to dig deeper when I get time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *