Thoughts after First Year Butterflying

Since I haven’t had time to bird the last two months I thought I’d take time to recap my thoughts after my first year butterflying.

Probably a harbinger of things to come but I found butterflying more satisfying than birding on many levels.

First Year Butterflying

An Anise Swallowtail in Western Colorado last June.

Pros

I can see more Bushwhacking (exploring) down the road to find butterflies.

Maybe my memory has faded from my beginning birding days but there seems to be more things to learn than with birding. Which I like.

Besides learning the physical appearance and ID of the butterflies you need to learn the host plants and where they grow. And if you want to take it a step farther you can learn and look for the egg, larva, and pupa.

You look for butterflies in the heat of the day. Which I really like. (Note all my posts from Western Colorado to be in 90 degree heat!)

In the summer when it is the 80’s and 90’s I can look for butterflies after work. Birds are usually quiet at that time.

Butterflies usually sit for analysis and study – unlike most birds.

Cons

Can’t go looking for butterflies if raining or cloudy.

In Indiana on a typical day you’ll see far fewer species of butterflies than birds. This doesn’t bother me as long as you are seeing a few. For comparison in Indiana with work you could annually see 300 species of birds versus 80-90 species of butterfly.

Butterflies mainly fly April-September in Indiana. You can go birding anytime.

Similarities

To be “good” at either it’s hard work. Nothing is easy. But probably since its new Butterflying seems harder.

Like bird migrants there are certain butterfly species that only appear for a short period of time.

Several butterflies are tied to a particular habitat, more so than birds. But to see gulls and large numbers of waterfowl you go to certain locations. So somewhat similar. But that also means you won’t see as many butterfly species at the local park.

And soon I’ll post thoughts on a larger level of butterflying.

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3 Responses to Thoughts after First Year Butterflying

  1. Mike says:

    Next is botany…or etymology ha

  2. Greg M says:

    Are there any butterflies prone to vagrancy? And if so, does their lifespan and comparative fragility make it possible to chase them as one might a rare bird?

    • BobC says:

      Good question. From what I can gather from the internet there isn’t the culture of chasing as there is in birding. There are vagrant butterflies but I haven’t corm across people chasing them though. I’m going to put this on the back burner and address at the end of next year when I’ve put in more time.

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