Johnson County – March Big Walking (Biking) Day – Ross’s Geese

I did my third Big Monthly Walking Day today.  I wanted to go Saturday but with the weather I knew it wouldn’t be productive.  So I had to go on Sunday.  The problem was it was my wife’s birthday and my daughter went to work at two.  So I had to cut the morning walk to be home by 10:30 or so.  I then planned to go back out later in the afternoon.

I started the day in a different area, a little farther out in the country.  I figured I would get grassland and country birds.  Wrong choice. I only heard a group of Horned Larks and nothing else that I wouldn’t get in the city.  But I did find a Red-tailed Hawks nest only a half mile from home.  And an Eastern Meadowlark was at the edge of town.

The female flew out of the nest about 5 seconds before I took the image.  Franklin 03/30/13
The female flew out of the nest about 5 seconds before I took the image. Franklin 03/30/13

The morning turned out to be what I expected, no great surprises or misses.

I was hoping the Blue Jays had an owl cornered, but I guess they were just flying around the neighborhood.  Franklin 03/30/14
I was hoping the Blue Jays had an owl cornered, but I guess they were just flying around the neighborhood. Franklin 03/30/14

The only real surprise was a Swamp Sparrow where I didn’t expect one and there was a pair of Eurasian-collared Doves instead the usual one I have been seeing.

Brown Creeper inching up a tree.  Franklin 03/30/13
Brown Creeper inching up a tree. Franklin 03/30/13

I walked a little over 5 miles and ended up with 37 species.

For the afternoon I needed to go to the Lowes pond – 3.3 miles – a little over an hours walk with no where to bird in between.  I decided to forgo the walk but keep it in the spirit of BIGBY, so I rode my bike which only took 20 minutes to cover the distance.  The pond had the usual birds with a changing Horned Grebe the best looking bird.

Took this photo Saturday when the Horned Grebe was closer.  Lowes Pond 03/29/13
Took this photo Saturday when the Horned Grebe was closer. Still not a very good photo.  Lowes Pond 03/29/13

And to think it was frozen only a little while ago?

Just a short time ago the pond was frozen...   Lowes/Walmart Pond - Franklin 03/30/14
Just a short time ago the pond was frozen…
Lowes/Walmart Pond – Franklin 03/30/14
Two guys ice fishing in the light snow.  Lowes/Walmart Pond 02/09/14
Lowes/Walmart Pond 02/09/14

I then rode out to the local high school to pick up the remaining grassland birds.  With that accomplished I was done for the day and started what I thought would be the half hour ride home.

Riding through the industrial area I went by a new building that has a retention pond that is filling up.  I saw some white birds and figured they had put out some fake swans to scare off the geese.  I then got closer and the white geese moved.  They were by some Canada Geese and heading over the edge but from the distance my first thought was Ross’s Geese!

My first thought was that someone had put out fake geese, then they started to move.  Two of the six geese going sown to the pond. Franklin 03/30/14
My first thought was that someone had put out fake geese, then they started to move. Two of the six geese going sown to the pond. Franklin 03/30/14

I then had to ride around the back of the building and and walk through some mud to get a better look.

ROGO Franklin 033014E

By their small size they sure looked like Ross’s.  A closer look showed the small bill with no discernible “grin patch”.  Looked good for Ross’s but since I have seen so few of them or even that many Snow Geese for that matter, and then usually at a distance, it still is a tough call.

ROGO Franklin 033014G

ROGO Franklin 033014F

ROGO Franklin 033014D

ROGO Franklin 033014C

The best picture of the day.

ROGO Franklin 033014A

I then headed home having walked over 5 miles, biked over 11, seeing 54 species on the day, and another county first for me.

Johnson County – Common Loons

In my last post I said the goal was to get out and bird more. To add at least one night a week for birding. Last night was the second week in a row I added a mid-week night for birding.

And since my goal is to look for uncommon birds in the local area and since it is the right time for loons and grebes, I thought I would hit a couple of ponds. I no sooner arrived at Driftwood SFA and a Bald Eagle flew over, the first I had seen in the county since Jan. 1. I didn’t even have time to get the camera out.

A look at the water and there was a Common Loon in the distance.

069

In fact there ended up being 2 loons.

072

Commons Loons aren’t that uncommon in Central Indiana but outside Lamb Lake they are to hard find in Johnson County.

One decided to flap it’s wings for me.

048

049

050

051

And then it took a look at me.

056

019

I then headed to another spot and left the loons to themselves.

046

I am now torn between Long-tailed Duck and Common Loon for the coolest looking bird migrating through our area. And I am glad I added the extra birding day.

 

 

Some FOY Birds

The objective of the last week was to see if I could locate some of the uncommon birds that only migrate through the county for a couple of weeks in the spring and fall.  Mainly Common Loon, Hermit Thrush, and Winter Wren.  So I have been to Driftwood SFA a few times in the last couple of days looking for Common Loon without luck.

I just like the way the late afternoon sun highlighted the white of the wing. Turkey Vulture - Johnson County Park 03/20/14
I just like the way the late afternoon sun highlighted the white of the wing. Turkey Vulture – Johnson County Park 03/20/14

With the temperature near 70F Friday night I took the bike out for a spin, heading out a dead end country road not far from our place.  My body wasn’t feeling good at the end of the easy ride but I came across my first Savanna Sparrows for the year.  I forget how short their tails are.  I also came across a small group of Horned Larks that I hadn’t expected.

The Red-tailed didn't have any interest in the Turkey Vulture eating on the road.  Johnson County 03/21/14
The Red-tailed didn’t have any interest in the Turkey Vulture eating on the road. Johnson County 03/21/14

Saturday I started at Driftwood again looking for loons.  As often happens I didn’t find the target bird but come across something else, in this case FOY Brown Thrasher and Field Sparrow.  Neither would pose for pictures but it was good to hear them.  There has been several Horned Grebes over the last week.

One of several Horned Grebes at Driftwood SFA.  03/20/14
One of several Horned Grebes at Driftwood SFA. 03/20/14

A quick stop at Casey’s had the local Turkey Vultures in a dead tree.

How many Turkey Vultures in a tree?  13? Edinburgh 03/22/14
How many Turkey Vultures in a tree? 13? Edinburgh 03/22/14
Reminds me of an old western movie.  Is the hero out of water over that way and the vultures are waiting for him to die? Edinburgh 03/22/14
Reminds me of an old western movie. Is the hero out of water over that way and the vultures are waiting for him to die?
Edinburgh 03/22/14
One of the Turkey Vultures in the morning sun.  Edinburgh 03/22/14
One of the Turkey Vultures in the morning sun. Edinburgh 03/22/14

The main part of the morning was spent walking the east side of Atterbury FWA.  The road is closed for good reason.  There are a couple of washouts that are going to need major repair.

Another pleasant stroll on an early spring day.  Did just a little bushwhacking.  Atterbury FWA - SE portion 03/22/14
Another pleasant stroll on an early spring day. Did just a little bushwhacking. Atterbury FWA – SE portion 03/22/14

I walked the road for a couple of miles seeing my first Eastern Phoebe and getting a good look at a Fox Sparrow.

FOY Eastern Phoebe - Atterbury FWA 03/22/14
FOY Eastern Phoebe – Atterbury FWA 03/22/14
Not sure if you see the blend of these colors on any other birds?  Probably but one doesn't come to mind.  Fox Sparrow - Back Atterbury FWA 03/22/14
Not sure if you see the blend of these colors on any other birds? Probably but one doesn’t come to mind. Fox Sparrow – Back Atterbury FWA 03/22/14
Same bird - front
Same bird – front
This guy was cruising by on Sugar Creek - Atterbury FWA.  03/22/14
This guy was cruising by on Sugar Creek – Atterbury FWA. 03/22/14

A quick stop at the Lowes/Walmart pond in Franklin had a lot less waterfowl than last week. They are already moving on…

Birding, Blogging, and Time Management

One of the things I have come to appreciate since I started blogging is the time it takes to create a good blog.  Especially one like Biking for Birds that is updated daily. The time that it takes to write a blog, proofread, and add pictures is more than I thought it would be.  But I am not complaining since it has made me a better birder since I now take the time to research something before publishing.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/87/Digital-clock-radio-basic.jpg/320px-Digital-clock-radio-basic.jpg
Not enough time to get everything done…

So with the extra time I have added to my life blogging I have had to go back to figuring out how to get everything I want to do done.  I don’t want to cut out anything.  Especially actually being out in the field birding, which I want to add more time.  So I go back to what I have done for the last 20 years.  In the mid 90’s I read Time Tactics of Very Successful People by B. Eugene Griessman which discusses how successful people from all fields get things done.  I have followed several of those things over the years but one key thing I took away from the book was blocking out a period of time to get accomplish tasks.

Time Tactics of Very Successful People

It’s not a knew concept but if you want to get something done you have to set aside the time and do it.  Usually at the expense of something else.  But I have found the something else is usually time wasted in front of some form of video – TV or internet.  So if I want to spend more time in the field birding then I have plan to be out every Tuesday night after work.  My current hours per week in the field are around 5-6 hours per week but I want them in the 8-10 hour range.  As I posted a while back to be successful in finding uncommon birds I need to be birding a minimum of 8 hours per week and closer to 10-12 hours.

A Merlin that was the result of spending extra time in the field.  Last April for about 2 weeks I would go home by a flooded field and scan for shorebirds. One night someone else was scanning looking for supper.  Johnson County 04/27/14
A Merlin that was the result of spending extra time in the field. Last April for about 2 weeks I would go home by a flooded field and scan for shorebirds. One night someone else was scanning looking for supper. Johnson County 04/21/14

I also have found that I write much better away from home, like at the local Starbucks.  If I try to write at home there are just to many distractions. So I need to set aside time to go somewhere and write. I once heard an interview on the radio discussing a very successful children’s author.  They said that everyday from 10AM to 12PM and 4-6PM he would go out to a small studio on his property and write.  He said that if writing was that important, then block out time and write. Of course this concept can pertain to anything in life, not just birding or writing.

So if you are letting other things keeping you from birding, them block out a period of time, and go birding!

Indiana Audubon Society Field Trip to Atterbury FWA – April 26, 2014

OK, mark your calenders, or phones, or computers or whatever people are using now.  The Indiana Audubon Society is sponsoring a field trip to Atterbury Fish and Wildlife Area on  April 26, 2014. Doug Gray will be leading the trip and he has asked me to help him out.  Here is the link to the official notice.

http://www.indianaaudubon.org/Home/tabid/37/ctl/Details/Mid/409/ItemID/122/Default.aspx

In the 14 months since I have move here my total species count  for the Atterbury/Driftwood/Johnson County Park area is 184 species.  I consider Atterbury/Driftwood/Johnson County Park complex all one big park since they are all next to each other.  On the last week of April last year I saw 64 species and the first week of May 76.  And I was just out birding and not trying to run up any counts so I am sure there were more species present those days.  So you get the idea on the numbers that are possible.

Some of the highlights were Bell’s Vireo, Yellow-breasted Chat, and both Cuckoos.  Only heard Black-billed, darn-it.  The following 3 photos were all taken in the same area in Johnson County Park.  Besides the Bell’s I know of several spots that one can see Prairie Warbler and Yellow-breasted Chats in the area.

Bell's Vireo - Prairie Warbler - Johnson County Park 05/04/13
Bell’s Vireo – Prairie Warbler – Johnson County Park 05/04/13
Prairie Warbler - Johnson County Park 04/27/13
Prairie Warbler – Johnson County Park 04/27/13
Long distance photo of a Yellow-breasted Chat - Johnson County Park 04/27/13
Long distance photo of a Yellow-breasted Chat – Johnson County Park 04/27/13

Let me know if you a have any questions or if certain species are seen there that time of year.  I’ll post more as we get closer to the date.

 

 

The Elusive White Ghost

When I go on my short walks after work I don’t carry my binoculars or any other birding gear.  I do what Ted Eubanks would describe as “bare-naked” birding.  The point of these short walks is for exercise and to get in shape for longer weekend walks.  Don’t get me wrong, I still watch the sky and listen to the birds, I just don’t bird at the usual slower pace.

So Wednesday I’m walking down the Greenway Trail in Franklin at a good clip when I hear what sounds like the call of a distant Barred Owl.  At 5:45 in the afternoon?  I have heard many Barred Owls in the afternoon so it doesn’t strike me as real odd.  Sorta odd, but not unusual.  As I proceed the call is much closer and I’m sure it is the call of a closer dove, not a distant owl.  But what throws me off is the call is not that of a Mourning Dove.  It sounds like the call of the Eurasian Collared-Dove.  But that can’t be since Eurasian Collared-Doves don’t exist in Johnson County.

Eurasian Collared-Dove - Fort Lauderdale, FL - October 2013
Eurasian Collared-Dove – Fort Lauderdale, FL – October 2013

When I moved here last year I made out my initial list of birds I should see in Johnson County.  I included Eurasian Collared-Dove in the second set of birds. Birds I should see that might take a little work.  I figured that since Illinois had Eurasian Collared-Doves in every town with a grain elevator, and even most towns without elevators, I shouldn’t have a problem finding them in semi-rural Johnson County. Not so.  After a few months of hanging out at grain elevators and not seeing any, I went back and checked the status and distribution charts and maps.

From Birds of North America Online
From Birds of North America Online

And what I found is that Eurasian Collared-Doves are basically not in Indiana.  Which completely stunned me since they are all over Illinois, less than a 100 miles away.  I know they are scattered around Indiana but aren’t widespread.  And I eventually saw them last year in Indiana in towns far from Johnson County.

So you can see my surprise when walking along I heard what sounded like a Eurasian Collared-Dove.  After twisting my neck around 18 directions I finally found the bird on a power line, not a telephone line but a power line.  So it is pretty far up.  The bird looks whiter and bulkier than a Mourning Dove.  The tail looks square and dark on the underside.  But I am “bare-naked” birding and even with my new glasses I’m not 100% sure since a Eurasian Collared-Dove shouldn’t be here.  The bird eventually flies and I walk on home rethinking this “bare-naked” birding.

Thursday I have rethought “bare-naked” birding and stick my binoculars in my coat pocket, just in case.  I don’t figure on a Eurasian Collared-Dove but you never know what my turn up.  No camera though, I don’t want to be that bogged down.  So I am walking the same path and who should be at the same spot?

Eurasian Collared-Dove on the Greenway Trail.  Photo taken on phone through binocs.  03/13/14
Eurasian Collared-Dove on the Greenway Trail. Photo taken on phone through binoculars. 03/13/14

That’s right, the Eurasian Collared-Dove. And in the same spot.  I really hadn’t expected that.  So I make the ID through my binoculars and take the above ID photo through my phone and binoculars.   Phone and Binocular picture taking is something I need to practice since I only got one decent photo.

The sighting of the Eurasian Collared-Dove has really got me thinking why they aren’t in Indiana or the NE part of the country.  If anyone has an idea I would like to hear it.  I checked all my sources with no answer.  So I will probably write a post on some of my thoughts.

 

Johnson County – #200

Since I am not a chaser my main birding goals have always revolved around the county I reside.  As I have often stated I believe that all birds that should be in, or come through, an area are there.  People just aren’t looking. Enough philosophizing and on with the story.

So when I moved here at the beginning of 2013 my only goal was to see if I could reach 200 species in Johnson County in calender year 2013.  And I fell a little short at 195.  But it has only taken a couple of months to get to 200 for the county.

196. Greater White-fronted Goose Feb. 1, 2014
197. Common Merganser Feb. 1, 2014
198. Snow Bunting Feb. 8, 2014
199. Long-tailed Duck Mar. 9, 2014

All cool looking birds in their own right.

So this morning I really wasn’t thinking about #200.  I went to the Lowes/Walmart pond at sunrise just in case a Red-necked Grebe or Red-throated Loon would show up as they have been over the area. And low and behold who should be there with 7 Ring-billed Gulls but 2 Herring Gulls – county bird #200.

Johnson County Bird #200 - Herring Gull.  And a complete surprise at that.  Lowes 08/09/14
Johnson County Bird #200 – Herring Gull. And a complete surprise at that. Lowes 03/09/14

It never crossed my mind I would see them in the county since Ring-billed Gulls are so scarce. And I am not saying they aren’t as good looking as the others on the above list. But…

Herring Gull - one of two that were present.  Lowes 03/09/14
Herring Gull – one of two that were present. Lowes 03/09/14
Herring Gull - one of two that were present.  Lowes 03/09/14
Herring Gull – one of two that were present. Lowes 03/09/14

Neither Gull came over to accept their prize, so I will keep it for species #300.

For those wondering #100 was a Solitary Sandpiper on 4/7/13.

 

 

Saturday – March 8 – Finally Open Water!

Today I did the one thing I hate to do birding. Drive to a spot, bird the spot drive, hurry to the next spot, bird, repeat.  The reason I did this is because I read a post by Don Gorney on IBird about the number of waterfowl had been dropping at Geist Reservoir NE of Indianapolis.  He thought this might be the end of the wave of waterfowl since the ice is melting and the birds are moving on.  It made sense to me so I thought I had better check every pond I knew in south Johnson County if I had a chance to see most of the waterfowl species this year.

I started at Lowes/Walmart pond, moved to the ponds of NW Atterbury FWA, then the NE part of Atterbury, and then on to Driftwood SFA.  Driftwood was still frozen, so no birds there to report.

On the day I picked up 5 new species for the year – Ring-billed Gull, Tree Swallow, Northern Pintail, Canvasback, and Ruddy Duck.  The Ring-billed Gulls were on the ice at Lowes and departed shortly after sunrise.  The Tree Swallows were flying over a frozen pond at Atterbury.  The Northern Pintail were on a pond on the NW side of Atterbury.

Nothing knew had turned over at Walmart/Lowes in the last couple of days but the Long-tailed Duck remains.  While there I heard a new call that took me a minute to figure out.  The Long-tailed Duck was calling! Luckily John Wolf was there and knew the call from listening to it on his phone.

Long-tailed Duck  - Lowes 03/08/14
Long-tailed Duck – Lowes 03/08/14
He appears to be thinking, "haven't you taken enough pictures already?"  - Lowes 03/08/14
He appears to be thinking, “haven’t you taken enough pictures already?” – Lowes 03/08/14
Redhead - Lowes 03/08/14
Redhead – Lowes 03/08/14

The Canvasback and Ruddy Duck were at Pisgah Lake and took some work to see.  The plan was to walk down the RR tracks to the bridge but with the nice weather people are back to running dogs in that area.  So walking back to the bridge was out of the question unless I wanted to be accosted by beagles.  I knew another way but it would mean bushwhacking.  And not easy bushwhacking – lots of thorn bushes if I remembered right.  And I did remember right and it wasn’t easy.

Just like last week.  How to get from point A to point B through this thorny mess?  Atterbury 03/08/14
Just like last week. How to get from point A to point B through this thorny mess? Atterbury 03/08/14

But after after a while and cussing beagles under my breath, I finally reached the spot where I could observe the bridge area.  And I immediately forgot about the bushwhacking when the first birds in the binocs were a male Canvasback and a pair of Ruddy Ducks.  Both species are expected in the county but I only saw a lone female Canvasback last year.  So the male Canvasback was a treat.  There were also Bufflehead, American Wigeon, Gadwall, Green-winged Teal, and Mallards present.  So it was worth the trouble.

The rewards of BushWhacking - a Mallard, American Wigeon, and Canvasback all grouped together.  Atterbury 03/08/14
The rewards of BushWhacking – a Mallard, American Wigeon, and Canvasback all grouped together. Atterbury 03/08/14
A long distance shot of a Ruddy Duck.  Atterbury 03/08/14
A long distance shot of a Ruddy Duck. Atterbury 03/08/14

Back at the car the first of several waves of Sandhill Cranes went over.

One of several flocks of Sandhill Cranes that went over Saturday.  High Over Atterbury 03/08/14
One of several flocks of Sandhill Cranes that went over Saturday. High Over Atterbury 03/08/14

And back home the Sandhill Cranes were flying right over me.

Sandhill Cranes flying right over the house.  Franklin 03/08/14
Sandhill Cranes flying right over the house. Franklin 03/08/14

So on the day the running from place to place paid off.  But I still didn’t like it.

March Forecast – 2014 – Hopefully Open Water !

I had planned to post this last Saturday but the arrival of the Long-tailed Duck made me shift blogging gears.

I don’t care how long I have been birding, but at the start of every month I still go through the exercise of seeing which birds I should expect in my local area – Johnson County, IN – for the next month.  I find it helps me to think about birds that might be coming through my area that I am not expecting.  After identifying the uncommon birds for the month I then go through my resources to make sure I know their key field marks, habitats, etc. I have also found that this exercise helps when I am out in the field and I see/hear a bird I haven’t seen for six months.  Once I see it something in the back of my mind goes, “Oh yea, that bird should be coming through this month”. Since I go though this exercise anyway I thought I would share this to help refresh everyone minds.

I also use it to help plan my outings by looking for the expected  uncommon birds that month.  I break down the month into early and late and look for the birds that should be coming through during those times.  With this routine I should see the birds that I would expect plus a few I hadn’t expected.  Case in point, last Saturday I was just expecting to see the expected waterfowl, but I came across a Long-tailed Duck.  The days before that I saw on IBird that there had been a constant flux of Long-tailed Ducks in the area over the last few days.  So I was somewhat prepared to ID Long-tailed Duck.

For March one birding in Johnson County IN a normal number of hours and habitats should see 84 species of birds, more or less.  This is par.

I first heard the wing beats of this Mute Swan as it flew over me.  Atterbury FWA 03/02/13
I first heard the wing beats of this Mute Swan as it flew over me. Atterbury FWA 03/02/13

Birds that are uncommon in Johnson County this time of year and that you will probably have to work a little harder to see: Common Loon, Snow Goose, Ross’s Goose, Northern Pintail, Canvasback, White-winged Scoter, Long-tailed Duck, Red-breasted Merganser, Ring-billed Gull, Hermit Thrush, American Pipit, Rusty Blackbird, Brewer’s Blackbird, and Purple Finch.

I found these 3 on a small pond east of Franklin - 03/02/13.
I found these 3 Snow Geese on a small pond east of Franklin – 03/02/13.

 

February 2014 Recap – Frozen Water

I thought I would start keeping a recap of the months so I would have a written record of what happened each month. Not just guess on what I thought I remembered. Like the quarterly recaps of the Indiana Audubon.  This would supplement my eBird lists.

This will be no surprise to anyone living in the Midwest that everything was affected in February by the snow, cold, and ice. Including birding.  This can easily be seen from my 2013 Johnson County list where I saw 71 species of birds compared to this year’s 56. Lists shown below. The way I remember February 2013 (see, no blog to look back at) was it was milder with most of the water open all month. There ware a few days were there was frozen ice but nothing like 2014. This year the water I usually bird was frozen except for a small hole in the Lowes/Walmart pond. And the Big Blue River in Edinburgh was partially open. But later in the month it was swollen from rain and melting snow.  So it really wasn’t good for birding.

The biggest difference between the 2014 and 2013 totals can be seen in the waterfowl totals. Last year I had  17 species of waterfowl and 10 this year. Also a lack of open water kept the Bald Eagles from coming back Atterbury . And the Ring-billed Gulls did not return like last year when they were eating the small fish at Pisgah Lake in Atterbury.

Also I noticed the sparrows that were abundant last year were missing this year. I don’t know if they were deeper in the bushes or wintered farther south.

Most of the birds I did see this year were the birds you would expect in winter in the Midwest  except for the Greater-white Fronted Geese at Lowes pond.

Greater White-fronted Goose on left, Canada Goose on right.  Picture was good for showing size difference between the species.  Picture taken 11/11/13  at Starved Rock State Park in Illinois.  Since the Greater White-fronted Goose came down the Illinois River Flyway, more were seen than in Indiana, but they were still an uncommon bird there.
Greater White-fronted Goose on left, Canada Goose on right. Picture was good for showing size difference between the species. Picture taken 11/11/13 at Starved Rock State Park in Illinois. Since the Greater White-fronted Goose came down the Illinois River Flyway, more were seen than in Indiana.  But they were still an uncommon bird there.

On the birding exercise front I lost four more pounds. I didn’t get to walk anywhere near as much as I wanted due to the fact that it was really cold and the trail I walk on was covered with 8-12 inches of snow a lot of days. So I ended up taking smaller walks around the local school. But I did increase my Big Walking Day on the last Saturday of the month to 12 miles.

Could I have seen more birds car birding than walking? Not sure because of the weather.

February 2013 – Johnson County February 2014 – Johnson County
Cackling Goose Greater White-fronted Goose
Canada Goose Canada Goose
Wood Duck Wood Duck
Gadwall American Black Duck
American Wigeon Mallard
American Black Duck Redhead
Mallard Common Goldeneye
Northern Shoveler Hooded Merganser
Northern Pintail Common Merganser
Redhead Great Blue Heron
Ring-necked Duck Turkey Vulture
Lesser Scaup Northern Harrier
Bufflehead Cooper’s Hawk
Common Goldeneye Red-shouldered Hawk
Hooded Merganser Red-tailed Hawk
Pied-billed Grebe American Coot
Great Blue Heron Sandhill Crane
Turkey Vulture Killdeer
Sharp-shinned Hawk Rock Pigeon
Cooper’s Hawk Mourning Dove
Bald Eagle Barred Owl
Red-shouldered Hawk Belted Kingfisher
Red-tailed Hawk Red-bellied Woodpecker
American Coot Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Sandhill Crane Downy Woodpecker
Killdeer Northern Flicker
American Woodcock Pileated Woodpecker
Ring-billed Gull American Kestrel
Rock Pigeon Blue Jay
Mourning Dove American Crow
Great Horned Owl Horned Lark
Barred Owl Carolina Chickadee
Northern Saw-whet Owl Tufted Titmouse
Belted Kingfisher White-breasted Nuthatch
Red-bellied Woodpecker Brown Creeper
Downy Woodpecker Carolina Wren
Hairy Woodpecker Golden-crowned Kinglet
Northern Flicker Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Pileated Woodpecker Eastern Bluebird
American Kestrel American Robin
Blue Jay Northern Mockingbird
American Crow European Starling
Horned Lark Lapland Longspur
Carolina Chickadee Snow Bunting
Tufted Titmouse American Tree Sparrow
White-breasted Nuthatch Song Sparrow
Brown Creeper White-throated Sparrow
Carolina Wren White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Kinglet Dark-eyed Junco
Ruby-crowned Kinglet Northern Cardinal
Eastern Bluebird Red-winged Blackbird
American Robin Eastern Meadowlark
Northern Mockingbird Common Grackle
European Starling House Finch
Yellow-rumped Warbler American Goldfinch
Eastern Towhee House Sparrow
American Tree Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow